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The next Labour government will restore the right values to the NHS, making strategic investments in staff, and delivering reforms that will improve services and save billions of pounds. These include integrating care, placing a new emphasis on prevention, and ensuring better access to services - so patients do not end up in hospital unless they need it.  Labour is determined to drive out the culture of limiting social care at home for frail, older and vulnerable to just 15 minutes, saying it is a symbol of what has gone wrong in the NHS where failure and false economies threaten the financial future of the service.

 

Labour’s 10-Year Plan will:

 

  • Invest in staff so the NHS has time to care
  • Integrate care from home to hospital
  • Give patients’ new rights to access care
  • End the neglect of mental health
  • Prevent ill-health
  • Restore the right values on to the NHS

 

Launching Labour’s 10-Year Plan for the NHS today, Andy Burnham said that false economies in social care have increased pressure on NHS funding with the number of avoidable hospital admissions soaring last year to a record high of more than half a million - costing the NHS around £1 billion.

 

  • Labour’s plan to integrate services from home to hospital will help end 15-minute care slots through new year-of-care budgets, incentivising providers to improve social care and prevent vulnerable patients falling ill or injuring themselves.
  • The next government will create a new arm of the NHS:  5,000 homecare workers within the NHS to help those with the greatest needs, including the terminally ill so they can stay with their family at the end of life, and those who are leaving hospital who need extra help if they are to move back into their homes.
  • All vulnerable older people would be offered a safety check to identify risks to their health like cold homes, loneliness and the likelihood of them falling so that problems can be tackled and they avoid unnecessary hospital visits.

Labour's 10 year plan for our NHS

The next Labour government will restore the right values to the NHS, making strategic investments in staff, and delivering reforms that will improve services and save billions of pounds. These...

The latest Government figures have confirmed the scale of the housing crisis facing Bristol. In just over two years the number of families accepted by Bristol City Council as being newly homeless has nearly quadrupled. 

 

At the same time Bristol Council has chosen to sell off homes to the private sector.

 

Reacting to the news Dawn Primarolo, Labour MP for Bristol South, said:

 

“These figures are appalling and shame our city. In the first nine months of last year more than 500 families became homeless in Bristol. Every one of those families is an individual tragedy, potentially forced to live in hostels or inappropriate bed and breakfast. This is just the tip of the iceberg and does not take into account the many thousands of people living in overcrowded or unsuitable accommodation.

 

A Freedom of Information Request has revealed that Bristol City Council has sold off hundreds of homes in the last few years, most under “Right to Buy” but dozens have also been sold to the private sector as “uneconomic to repair”.

 

Dawn said: “These figures show that every day last summer two families a day were becoming homeless.

 

“It is clear that the current Government, and the Mayor of Bristol, do not see housing as a priority. Rather than constructing the hundreds of affordable homes we need in Bristol South we have just a handful.

 

“Bristol City Council must review their sell-off strategy and we must force those developers who are sitting on undeveloped sites to build, and demand they fulfil their obligations to provide genuinely affordable homes to rent or buy.”

Bristol's Housing Crisis

The latest Government figures have confirmed the scale of the housing crisis facing Bristol. In just over two years the number of families accepted by Bristol City Council as being...

As Bristol’s Green Capital Year approaches the Mayor is to be challenged about his carbon footprint.

 

The Mayor has made frequent trips practically all round the world, including to China - twice, the United States - twice, Copenhagen, Cannes and Bordeaux, Frankfurt, Switzerland, Brussels and the Republic of Ireland. Many of these journeys, even short hops to France, have been made by plane.

 

Now Cllr Sean Beynon, Labour, Southville is set to ask the Mayor to estimate the impact these trips have had on his own carbon footprint.

 

“I'm not suggesting the Mayor should never fly - that would be silly. However, the Mayor rarely reveals the impact of these many trips, and he should surely be considering whether the cost and environmental impact are worth the benefits. At a time when he's pledged to cut carbon emissions in Bristol by 40 per cent, his own carbon footprint continues to spiral out of control. Perhaps he thinks he's too important to consider his own contribution, and wants to leave the heavy lifting in carbon reduction to ordinary Bristolians?

 

"As Green Capital, the eyes of Europe will be on Bristol. They should be able to see a Mayor leading by example, not jet-setting around the world," he said.  

Cllr Sean Beynon challenges Mayor on Carbon Footprint

As Bristol’s Green Capital Year approaches the Mayor is to be challenged about his carbon footprint.   The Mayor has made frequent trips practically all round the world, including to...

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